New Journal Writing by Gary Gillman on George Killian’s Bière Rousse

Beer and Food Writing

In addition to my extensive blog writing (1,409 blog posts to date) on beer, food, spirits and travel, many in series, I contribute regularly to journals and newsletters.

New Article on George Killian’s

I’m pleased to announce that my new article, “Roots of George Killian’s Bière Rousse”, was just published in No. 186, Spring issue, of the U.K.-based journal Brewery History.

The brand first appeared in France in 1975. Taking a deep dive, the article explains the goals and strategy of Pelforth Brewery in France when developing the brand, and the true origins of the “George Killian’s” brand name.*

I also express my view that the Bière Rousse represented well the red ale tradition of the Irish Lett family.

Brewery History is available in print-only format for three years from publication (except book reviews). To obtain a single copy of, or subscribe to, the journal, contact the journal at: books@breweryhistory.com

*Added February 6, 2022: since it was mentioned in a recent Twitter discussion concerning my article, I’ll add here that the Killian name, according to evidence I marshal in the article, originated with Lille-based Pelforth Brewery, which had researched the names of early Irish religious figures to help finalize a brand name. “Killian”, in other words, was not part of Bill Lett’s name, as commonly assumed by beer writers prior to my article appearing (beer writing in English, at any rate). Bill Lett had done the deal with Pelforth for the creation of George Killian’s Bière Rousse in the early 1970s.

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “New Journal Writing by Gary Gillman on George Killian’s Bière Rousse”

    • Thank you Jan, nice of you to say. I wish it was available in online form but such is not the case at present, under the journal’s practice.

      Hope this finds you well.

      Gary

      Reply

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