“An Organized Disturbance…”

A Bunny Imperious

The American Charles N. Miller’s 12-page encomium to Welsh rabbit*, written in 1899, is one of the greatest tributes to any food, indeed it rivals Charles Lamb’s famous paean to roast pig.

Miller’s essay is all the more remarkable for being (hitherto) unknown. A sample of his imaginative drollery:

Bass Extra Pale Ale, Miller’s “first, best, perfect corroborant”, is feted in today’s vernacular, or more specifically Britain’s, as wingman. Brit-talk is apposite though, we are in Albion’s shadow despite that Miller was a Yank.

Bass beer, even in its modern decline, is still understood. And Welsh rabbit, well, it hangs by a hare in the culinary acquis. A renewal is in order, of both.

*Extract is via HathiTrust digital library, at the link shown.

2 thoughts on ““An Organized Disturbance…”

  1. Cheese on toast – a teatime favourite from way, way back as kids at home. Sometimes with cooked tomato, or tomato slices grilled on top. There was one option in the cafe at our local department store in Streatham with a nicely grilled rasher of bacon on top ……

    In the University Union at Newcastle they did a fine cheese on toast, the cheese having been grated, and then creamed with either mayonnaise, or more likely salad cream, and a little mustard, and then thickly spread on bread that had been grilled on one side, and then grilled to a bubbling brown. And even better, turn it into a sandwich with a buttered slice of toast liberally spread with a good bitter marmalade. That with a pint mug of tea was a perfect breakfast – and hangover killer before the first lecture!

    And thereby stimulates a trail – of Scotch Woodcock and other gentlemanly savouries, still served in the better dining rooms ……

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2012/jan/09/savoury-course-endorse

    And we’re told the best cheese on toast is made with stout!

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/feb/16/how-to-make-cheese-on-toast

    • Excellent, thanks. Good to know this quintessentially British speciality is still doing well on the home front. That the Guardian has investigated this area is encouraging!
      Gary

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